Suspects Himself To Have Been Poisoned





11. One of the neighbours brought Shidiak a letter, cautioning him, if

he went to the shekh's house, not to smoke or drink with him.



12. Word came to Asaad, that the shekh was with the family below, and

would be glad to see him. Asaad went down, but in a few minutes came up,

pale and trembling, and said he was exceedingly dizzy and faint. He had

just taken coffee below, attended with suspicious circumstances, and

begged to know if he might not be poisoned. We opened a medical book we

had, and explained to him, as rapidly as possible, the symptoms of a

poisoned person. "Oh! these are my feelings," said he, and fell upon his

knees before his seat in silent prayer. We immediately gave him an

emetic, which operated well, and before night he was relieved of every

alarming symptom. The youth who gave the coffee, being sent for, gave

good evidence of having had no bad intentions; and notwithstanding many

suspicious circumstances, we did not think the evidence of an attempt at

poison sufficiently strong, to prosecute any public inquiry into the

matter.



16. A youth from Der el Kamer called to see Asaad. He remarked, that he

once saw a priest at his village tear in pieces five of these books of

ours, but he could not tell for what reasons. He had, apparently, never

seen the ten commandments before, and was very much surprised to find

image-worship so expressly condemned in them. A letter was received by

Asaad from the patriarch, written in very plausible terms.





Sketches Of The Lives Of Some Of The Most Eminent Reformers T Loseby H Ramsey T Thirtell Margaret Hide And Agnes Stanley facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

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